Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

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  • Roman Catholic Parish of the Diocese of Erie


    Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

    Punxsutawney, PA, Est. 1885

  • Saint Adrian Church, Delancey, PA, Est. 1889

  • Saint Anthony Church, Walston, PA, Est. 1897

  • Saint Joseph, Husband of Mary Church, Anita, PA, Est. 1903

Welcome

to Ss. Cosmas & Damian
Roman Catholic Parish
with churches at St. Adrian,
St. Anthony, and St. Joseph

Having faith in Jesus Christ, guided by the Holy Spirit and committed to living Gospel values, we, the members of Saints Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church strive to serve the people of the Punxsutawney area by our celebration of the Word and Sacraments. The mission of our community is to proclaim, teach, and share the good news of God’s love with others, bringing salvation to all in Jesus Christ.

Mass Schedule

Daily 8:00 AM (Weekdays)
9:00 AM (Friday during School Year)
Sunday Saturday Evening: 4:30 PM
Sunday Summer Schedule (May 1 - Aug. 31): 8:00 AM & 10:00 AM
Sunday Winter Schedule (Sept. 1 - April 30): 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM

For additional mass times and liturgical celebrations, particularly during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Confession Schedule

Saturday Afternoon 3:45 PM
After Mass on Saturday Evening 5:30 PM
After Mass on the Thursday before First Friday 8:30 AM

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Join Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish

If you would like to join the Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish Family or change your registration information, please click on the button below to fill out our online membership form.

Bulletin

Saint of the Day

  • Solemnity of the Nativity of Saint John the Baptist

    <em>St. John the baptist</em> | Alessandro Rosi
    Image: St. John the baptist | Alessandro Rosi

    The Nativity of Saint John the Baptist

    Saint of the Day for June 24

     

    Saint John the Baptist’s Story

    Jesus called John the greatest of all those who had preceded him: “I tell you, among those born of women, no one is greater than John….” But John would have agreed completely with what Jesus added: “[Y]et the least in the kingdom of God is greater than he” (Luke 7:28).

    John spent his time in the desert, an ascetic. He began to announce the coming of the Kingdom, and to call everyone to a fundamental reformation of life. His purpose was to prepare the way for Jesus. His baptism, he said, was for repentance. But one would come who would baptize with the Holy Spirit and fire. John was not worthy even to untie his sandals. His attitude toward Jesus was: “He must increase; I must decrease” (John 3:30).

    John was humbled to find among the crowd of sinners who came to be baptized the one whom he already knew to be the Messiah. “I need to be baptized by you” (Matthew 3:14b). But Jesus insisted, “Allow it now, for thus it is fitting for us to fulfill all righteousness” (Matthew 3:15b). Jesus, true and humble human as well as eternal God, was eager to do what was required of any good Jew. John thus publicly entered the community of those awaiting the Messiah. But making himself part of that community, he made it truly messianic.

    The greatness of John, his pivotal place in the history of salvation, is seen in the great emphasis Luke gives to the announcement of his birth and the event itself—both made prominently parallel to the same occurrences in the life of Jesus. John attracted countless people to the banks of the Jordan, and it occurred to some people that he might be the Messiah. But he constantly deferred to Jesus, even to sending away some of his followers to become the first disciples of Jesus.

    Perhaps John’s idea of the coming of the Kingdom of God was not being perfectly fulfilled in the public ministry of Jesus. For whatever reason, when he was in prison he sent his disciples to ask Jesus if he was the Messiah. Jesus’ answer showed that the Messiah was to be a figure like that of the Suffering Servant in Isaiah. John himself would share in the pattern of messianic suffering, losing his life to the revenge of Herodias.


    Reflection

    John challenges us Christians to the fundamental attitude of Christianity—total dependence on the Father, in Christ. Except for the Mother of God, no one had a higher function in the unfolding of salvation. Yet the least in the kingdom, Jesus said, is greater than he, for the pure gift that the Father gives. The attractiveness as well as the austerity of John, his fierce courage in denouncing evil—all stem from his fundamental and total placing of his life within the will of God.


    Saint John the Baptist is the Patron Saint of:

    Baptism

    Read more