Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

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  • Roman Catholic Parish of the Diocese of Erie


    Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

    Punxsutawney, PA, Est. 1885

  • Saint Adrian Church, Delancey, PA, Est. 1889

  • Saint Anthony Church, Walston, PA, Est. 1897

  • Saint Joseph, Husband of Mary Church, Anita, PA, Est. 1903

Welcome

to Ss. Cosmas & Damian
Roman Catholic Parish
with churches at St. Adrian,
St. Anthony, and St. Joseph

Having faith in Jesus Christ, guided by the Holy Spirit and committed to living Gospel values, we, the members of Saints Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church strive to serve the people of the Punxsutawney area by our celebration of the Word and Sacraments. The mission of our community is to proclaim, teach, and share the good news of God’s love with others, bringing salvation to all in Jesus Christ!

Mass Schedule

Daily 8:00 AM (Weekdays)
9:00 AM (Friday during School Year)
Sunday Saturday Evening: 4:30 PM
Sunday Summer Schedule (May 1 - Aug. 31): 8:00 AM & 10:00 AM
Sunday Winter Schedule (Sept. 1 - April 30): 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM

For additional mass times and liturgical celebrations, particularly during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Confession Schedule

Saturday Afternoon 3:45 PM
After Mass on Saturday Evening 5:30 PM
After Mass on the Thursday before First Friday 8:30 AM

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Join Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish

If you would like to join the Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish Family or change your registration information, please click on the button below to fill out our online membership form.

Bulletin

Saint of the Day

  • Saint Gilbert of Sempringham

    Sculpture of Saint Gilbert of Sempringham at Essen, Belgium | photo by Bocachete
    Image: Sculpture of Saint Gilbert of Sempringham at Essen, Belgium | photo by Bocachete

    Saint Gilbert of Sempringham

    Saint of the Day for February 16

    (c. 1083 – February 4, 1189)

     

    Saint Gilbert of Sempringham’s Story

    Gilbert was born in Sempringham, England, into a wealthy family, but he followed a path quite different from that expected of him as the son of a Norman knight. Sent to France for his higher education, he decided to pursue seminary studies.

    He returned to England not yet ordained a priest, and inherited several estates from his father. But Gilbert avoided the easy life he could have led under the circumstances. Instead he lived a simple life at a parish, sharing as much as possible with the poor. Following his ordination to the priesthood he served as parish priest at Sempringham.

    Among the congregation were seven young women who had expressed to him their desire to live in religious life. In response, Gilbert had a house built for them adjacent to the Church. There they lived an austere life, but one which attracted ever more numbers; eventually lay sisters and lay brothers were added to work the land. The religious order formed eventually became known as the Gilbertines, though Gilbert had hoped the Cistercians or some other existing order would take on the responsibility of establishing a rule of life for the new order. The Gilbertines, the only religious order of English origin founded during the Middle Ages, continued to thrive. But the order came to an end when King Henry VIII suppressed all Catholic monasteries.

    Over the years a special custom grew up in the houses of the order called “the plate of the Lord Jesus.” The best portions of the dinner were put on a special plate and shared with the poor, reflecting Gilbert’s lifelong concern for less fortunate people.

    Throughout his life, Gilbert lived simply, consumed little food, and spent a good portion of many nights in prayer. Despite the rigors of such a life he died at well over age 100.


    Reflection

    When he came into his father’s wealth, Gilbert could have lived a life of luxury, as many of his fellow priests did at the time. Instead, he chose to share his wealth with the poor. The charming habit of filling “the plate of the Lord Jesus” in the monasteries he established reflected his concern. Today’s Operation Rice Bowl echoes that habit: eating a simpler meal and letting the difference in the grocery bill help feed the hungry.


    CMF CURO SOD SAINT PG FOOTER Feb 15-21

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