Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

On the App Store!

More Information

  • Roman Catholic Parish of the Diocese of Erie


    Ss. Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church

    Punxsutawney, PA, Est. 1885

  • Saint Adrian Church, Delancey, PA, Est. 1889

  • Saint Anthony Church, Walston, PA, Est. 1897

  • Saint Joseph, Husband of Mary Church, Anita, PA, Est. 1903

Welcome

to Ss. Cosmas & Damian
Roman Catholic Parish
with churches at St. Adrian,
St. Anthony, and St. Joseph

Having faith in Jesus Christ, guided by the Holy Spirit and committed to living Gospel values, we, the members of Saints Cosmas & Damian Roman Catholic Church strive to serve the people of the Punxsutawney area by our celebration of the Word and Sacraments. The mission of our community is to proclaim, teach, and share the good news of God’s love with others, bringing salvation to all in Jesus Christ.

Mass Schedule

Daily 8:00 AM (Weekdays)
9:00 AM (Friday during School Year)
Sunday Saturday Evening: 4:30 PM
Sunday Summer Schedule (May 1 - Aug. 31): 8:00 AM & 10:00 AM
Sunday Winter Schedule (Sept. 1 - April 30): 8:00 AM & 11:00 AM

For additional mass times and liturgical celebrations, particularly during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Confession Schedule

Saturday Afternoon 3:45 PM
After Mass on Saturday Evening 5:30 PM
After Mass on the Thursday before First Friday 8:30 AM

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Other times by appointment. Please call the parish office. For additional confession times during the Seasons of Advent and Lent, please consult the parish bulletin.

Join Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish

If you would like to join the Saints Cosmas & Damian Parish Family or change your registration information, please click on the button below to fill out our online membership form.

Bulletin

Saint of the Day

  • Saint Andrew Dung-Lac and Companions

    St Andrew Dung-Lac and Companion Martyrs | photo by Lawrence OP | flickr
    Image: St Andrew Dung-Lac and Companion Martyrs | photo by Lawrence OP | flickr

    Saint Andrew Dung-Lac and Companions

    Saint of the Day for November 24

    (1791 – December 21, 1839; Companions d. 1820 – 1862)

     

    Saint Andrew Dung-Lac and Companions’ Story

    Andrew Dung-Lac, a Catholic convert ordained to the priesthood, was one of 117 people martyred in Vietnam between 1820 and 1862. Members of the companions group gave their lives for Christ in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, and received beatification during four different occasions between 1900 and 1951. All were canonized during the papacy of Saint John Paul II.

    Christianity came to Vietnam through the Portuguese. Jesuits opened the first permanent mission at Da Nang in 1615. They ministered to Japanese Catholics who had been driven from Japan.

    Severe persecutions were launched at least three times in the 19th century. During the six decades after 1820, between 100,000 and 300,000 Catholics were killed or subjected to great hardship. Foreign missionaries martyred in the first wave included priests of the Paris Mission Society, and Spanish Dominican priests and tertiaries.

    In 1832, Emperor Minh-Mang banned all foreign missionaries, and tried to make all Vietnamese deny their faith by trampling on a crucifix. Like the priest-holes in Ireland during English persecution, many hiding places were offered in homes of the faithful.

    Persecution broke out again in 1847, when the emperor suspected foreign missionaries and Vietnamese Christians of sympathizing with a rebellion led by of one of his sons.

    The last of the martyrs were 17 laypersons, one of them a 9-year-old, executed in 1862. That year a treaty with France guaranteed religious freedom to Catholics, but it did not stop all persecution.

    By 1954, there were over a million Catholics—about seven percent of the population—in the north. Buddhists represented about 60 percent. Persistent persecution forced some 670,000 Catholics to abandon lands, homes and possessions and flee to the south. In 1964, there were still 833,000 Catholics in the north, but many were in prison. In the south, Catholics were enjoying the first decade of religious freedom in centuries, their numbers swelled by refugees.

    During the Vietnamese war, Catholics again suffered in the north, and again moved to the south in great numbers. Now reunited, the entire country is under Communist rule.


    Reflection

    It may help a people who associate Vietnam only with a 20th-century war to realize that the cross has long been a part of the lives of the people of that country. Even as some people ask again the unanswered questions about United States involvement and disengagement, the faith rooted in Vietnam’s soil proves hardier than the forces that willed to destroy it.


    Saints resources